Mask Making

Even today masks are still worn during temple dances in which the Balinese teach each other epic stories of their Hindu religion, and celebrate various stages of life, the rice planting and harvesting season and the victory of good over evil. A mask carver is called the ‘undagitapel’ and those who make the mask for temples have to be a member of the Brahman caste since he knows the required rituals involved with making a sacred mask.  The Balinese believe that everything has a soul: the rain, the winds, a rock and even a mask.

The village of Mas just south of Ubud is most famous for its amazing masks and woodcarvings. When you walk around Mas you’ll observe many craftsmen working on a mask or a wooden statue where they use over 30 different tools to carve out the wood. There are four types of Bali masks found in most of these shops – human, animal, gods and demons

Tilem Gallery, Tantra Gallery, Ida Bagus Anom (for masks), and Ida Bagus Sutarja (for masks) are some of the most renowned places where masterworks are still sold amid decorative pieces which are produced in quantity for the travel memento and mass export market.

The Houses of Masks and Puppets (Rumah Topeng and Wayang) displays various kinds of masks and puppets from different regions in Indonesia and around the world that have been collected, stored, and displayed for the public since 2006.The collection includes more than 1,200 masks and 4,700 puppets. Located just a few miles from the heart of Ubud, the House of Masks and Puppets covers more than 1 hectare of land surrounded by traditional Balinese village and rice fields. The land provides a wide range of facilities, including a tropical garden, exhibition rooms, performance buildings, and a Balinese house.

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